Mapping Indigenous LA: A CDH Project Collaboration in the News!

On behalf of CDH, I would like to congratulate the team behind one of our past project collaborations, Mapping Indigenous LA (MILA), for being featured earlier this week on KPCC’s “Take Two” news program. The humanities are criticized for being irrelevant to the needs of modern America. MILA’s engagement with its community partners, however, shows just how powerful and relevant the humanities continue to be at helping our citizens tell their stories and sustain their communities.

You can read (or listen to!) the whole article at: http://www.scpr.org/programs/take-two/2016/04/19/48038/ucla-project-maps-la-s-indigenous-communities/. You can read more about CDH’s collaboration with MILA at http://www.cdh.ucla.edu/projects/mapping-indigenous-l-a/.

CDH was a proud collaborator on this project, and invites collaborations from anyone at UCLA with a digital project idea: we can help you choose technologies, seek funding, secure infrastructure, and plan for the lifespan of your project. Email me to get started! – jlynch at humnet dot ucla dot edu.


John A. Lynch is the Academic Technology Manager at CDH. He received his BA in Classics from Loyola Marymount University, MA in Classics from UC Santa Barbara, and PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures (Assyriology) from UCLA. At CDH, he focuses on helping faculty define and achieve their digital project goals. He defines the Humanities as “those products of human activity that create a sense of awe in their viewers,” and is continually awestruck by the ideas and vision of UCLA faculty and students.

 

About the Author

John A. Lynch is the Academic Technology Manager at CDH. He received his BA in Classics from Loyola Marymount University, MA in Classics from UC Santa Barbara, and PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures (Assyriology) from UCLA. At CDH, he focuses on helping faculty define and achieve their digital project goals. He defines the Humanities as “those products of human activity that create a sense of awe in their viewers,” and is continually awestruck by the ideas and vision of UCLA faculty and students.